Agyanka

Agyanka ( Greek: ορφανός, romanized: orphanós) Agyanka yɛ abɔfra a ne maame anaa ne papa awu agya no.[1][2][3]

Ɛyɛ adeɛ a yɛtae de di dwuma , Ɛyɛ abɔfra a nawofoɔ awu na yɛfrɛ no awesia. Sɛ yɛde retoto mmoa ho a, Ɛyɛ deɛ ne maame awu nko ara,(i.e. Sɛ maame no na awu a ne mma no yɛ agyanka mfa ho sɛ papa no te ase).[4]

Agyanka ase kyerɛSesa

Agyanka a ɔwɔ ne maame nna so by Uroš Predić wɔ afe1888.

Nnipakuo bi kyerɛkuerɛ agyanka mu sɛ wɔbɛhu. Nkyerɛkyerɛ mu baako a wɔde di dwuma wɔ United States ne sɛ ɛyɛ obi a nawofoɔ awu anaa ntam atete.

Deɛ edi mu ne sɛ,Agyanka yɛ obi a ɔnni awofoɔ bi a wɔbɛhwɛ wɔn. Nanso, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS(UNAIDS), ne ekuo huu sɛ abɔfra biara wahwere nawofoɔ biara yɛ agyanka. Wei nti abɔfra a ne maame awu yɛ agyanka ɛnna deɛ awofoɔ baanu ne nyinaa awu nso de awesia.

Wɔn dodoɔSesa

Afghan Abeyewa a ɔwɔ Kabul, Afghanistan nnyanka fie wɔ afe Ɔpɛpɔn,2002

Wɔtete Nnyanka wɔ aman a wɔkɔ nkan efiri sɛ abɔfra biara hia asofoɔ na watumi atena ase wɔ wɔn mmɔfra brem. Nnyanko dodoɔ no ara wɔ war-torn nkurom ebi ne Afghanistan.

Continent Number of

orphans (1000s)

Orphans as percentage

of all children

Africa 34,294 11.9%
Asia 65,504 6.5%
Latin America & Caribbean 8,166 7.4%
Total 107,964 7.6%
Country Orphans as % of all children AIDS orphans as % of orphans Total orphans Total orphans (AIDS related) Maternal (total) Maternal (AIDS related) Paternal (total) Paternal (AIDS related) Double (total) Double (AIDS related)
Botswana(1990) 5.9 3.0 34,000 1,000 14,000 < 100 23,000 1,000 2,000 < 100
Botswana (1995) 8.3 33.7 55,000 18,000 19,000 7,000 37,000 13,000 5,000 3,000
Botswana (2001) 15.1 70.5 98,000 69,000 69,000 58,000 91,000 69,000 62,000 61,000
Lesotho(1990) 10.6 2.9 73,000 < 100 31,000 < 100 49,000 < 100 8,000 < 100
Lesotho (1995) 10.3 5.5 77,000 4,000 31,000 1,000 52,000 4,000 7,000 1,000
Lesotho (2001) 17.0 53.5 137,000 73,000 66,000 38,000 108,000 63,000 37,000 32,000
Malawi(1990) 11.8 5.7 524,000 30,000 233,000 11,000 346,000 23,000 55,000 6,000
Malawi (1995) 14.2 24.6 664,000 163,000 305,000 78,000 442,000 115,000 83,000 41,000
Malawi (2001) 17.5 49.9 937,000 468,000 506,000 282,000 624,000 315,000 194,000 159,000
Uganda(1990) 12.2 17.4 1,015,000 177,000 437,000 72,000 700,000 138,000 122,000 44,000
Uganda (1995) 14.9 42.4 1,456,000 617,000 720,000 341,000 1,019,000 450,000 282,000 211,000
Uganda (2001) 14.6 51.1 1,731,000 884,000 902,000 517,000 1,144,000 581,000 315,000 257,000
  • 2001 figures from 2002 UNICEF/UNAIDS report
  • China: A survey conducted by the Ministry of Civil Affairs in 2005 showed that China has about 573,000 orphans below 18 years old.
  • Russia: According to Russian reports from 2002 cited in the New York Times, 650,000 children are housed in orphanages. They are released at age 16, and 40% become homeless, while 30% become criminals or commit suicide.
  • Latin America: Street children have a major presence in Latin America; some estimate that there are as many as 40 million street children in Latin America. Although not all street children are orphans, all street children work and many do not have significant family support.
  • United States: About 2 million children in the United States (or about 2.7 percent of children) have a deceased mother or father. About 100,000 children have lost both parents.


AbakwasɛmSesa

Akoo, Nsaayadeɛ (Sɛ ebia AIDS), Nsaayadeɛ ne Ohia[5] na ama mmɔfra pii Naa yɛ nnyanka. Wiase ako a ɛtɔ so mmienu (1939-1945), ɛmu nnipa dodoɔ no ara na ɛwuiɛ , maa no gyaa nnyanka bebree wɔ Aman hodoɔ so—Europe wɔn bɛyɛ 1,000,000 Kɔpem 13,000,000. Judt (2006) Nnyanka bɛyɛ 9,000 na ɛwɔo Czechoslovakia, 60,000 nso wɔ Netherlands 300,000 Wɔ Poland Ɛna 200,000 nso wɔ Yugoslavia, ɛna ebi nso wɔ, Germany, Italy, China ne nkuro afoforɔ so.[6]

Beaeɛ a menyaa mmoa firiiɛSesa

  1. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orphan#cite_note-1
  2. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orphan#cite_note-2
  3. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orphan#cite_note-3
  4. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orphan#cite_note-4
  5. Roman, Nicoleta (8 November 2017). "Introduction". In Roman, Nicoleta (ed.). Orphans and Abandoned Children in European History: Sixteenth to Twentieth Centuries. Routledge Studies in Modern European History. Abingdon: Routledge (published 2017). ISBN 9781351628839. Retrieved 25 November 2020. The industrial revolution touched both villages and cities, with migration from one to the other going hand-in-hand with urban overpopulation and severe poverty. Urban population growth also led to an increase in abandonment, the poor swinging between finding work, begging or claiming social assistance from the State as a means of integrating themselves and their family, including their children, into society.
  6. For a high estimate see I.C.B. Dear and M.R.D. Foot, eds. The Oxford companion to World War II (1995) p. 208; for lower, see Tony Judt, Postwar: a history of Europe since 1945 (2006) p. 21.